History Of Central Institute Of Indian Languages

The central institute of Indian languages is situated in Mysuru, Karnataka. It is a teaching and research institute that began operation on July 17, 1969, and is a part of the Language Bureau of the Ministry of The Human Resources Department. This institute aims to preserve, protect and document dying languages like a minority or tribal languages.

The Central Institute of Indian Languages (Bharathiya Bhasha Sansthan) was first established in 1969 with seven centres placed at strategic points across the country. They are:

    1. Centre for Classical Languages
    2. Centre for Tribal, Minor, Endangered Languages & Language Policies
    3. Centre for Lexicography, Folklore, Literature and Translation Studies
    4. Centre for Literacy Studies
    5. Centre for Testing and Evaluation
    6. Centre for Materials Production, Publications and Sales
    7. Centre for Information on Indian Languages


The objectives of the Central Institute of Indian Languages are multiple and are given below.

  • The Central Institute of Indian Languages assists and advises the State and Central Government in matters relating to language.
  • The Central Institute of Indian Languages creates content and corpus, contributing to the development of all Indian languages. It conducts interdisciplinary research in the field of language pedagogy, language research, language technology, language analysis and language use in society, which in turn, helps contribute to the documentation and preservation of the language in question.
  • The Central Institute of Indian Languages aims to protect and preserve minor, minority and tribal languages.
  • The Central Institute of Indian Languages aims to promote linguistic harmony by teaching 15 Indian languages to non-native speakers of the language.

The Central Institute of Indian Languages has created academic strategies to create a place for primary education in minority languages. They then got materials and skilled manpower to implement these ideas. The Central Institute of Indian Languages also conducts several programmes, both on its own, and in collaboration with Universities, educational institutions, governmental and non-governmental institutions, voluntary organisations etc., covering topics ranging from categories of the North-Eastern States to Schedule Tribe upliftment. The idea is to get these languages familiarised and help preserve them through speech and text.

The Central Institute of Indian Languages has previously done projects like The Andaman and Nicobar Project, The Neo Literate Children Literature Material Bank, Katha Bharathi, Composite Correspondence Course in Kannada (CCCK), Bhasha Mandakini, etc. to name a few. The schemes started by the Central Institute of Indian Languages include The National Testing Service, The Centre for Excellence in Studies of Classic Kannada (CESCK), Scheme for Protection and Preservation of Endangered Languages (SPPEL) etc. to name a few of them.

Classical language centres for the study of regional languages like Kannada, Telugu, Odia and Malayalam have also been set up in their respective states to make sure that regional languages do not go extinct.

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